The Prince Of Wales's Own Regiment Of Yorkshire (14Th,15Th) Cap Badge

EUR 14,44 Achat immédiat 8d 12h, EUR 3,11 Livraison, 30-Day Retours, Remboursement si vous n'avez pas reçu ce que vous aviez commandé en cas de paiement avec PayPal.

Vendeur: queenslancer (13.410) 100%, Lieu où se trouve: Essex, Lieu de livraison: Worldwide, Numéro de l'objet: 152809306256 THE PRINCE OF WALES'S OWN REGIMENT OF YORKSHIRE (14TH,15TH) CAP BADGE THE PRINCE OF WALES'S OWN REGIMENT OF YORKSHIRE (14TH,15TH) CAP BADGE Click image to enlarge Description The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire (14th,15th) Cap Badge This Sale is for the Cap Badge as formerly worn by The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire (14th,15th). Brand new and unissued chromed metal in an all Silver finish, approx. 25mm high, complete with it's mounted slider and made by the London, Badge & Button Co. NSN: 8455-99-869-5601 DESC: INSIG SERV CAP THE PRINCE OF WALES OWN REG OF YORKSHIRE Guaranteed new and unissued, in mint condition. Brief Regimental History The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire was an Infantry Regiment of the British Army, part of the King's Division. It was formed on the 25th April 1958 by the amalgamation of The West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own) (14th Foot) and The East Yorkshire Regiment (Duke of York's Own) (15th Foot). After 48 years service the Regiment was amalgamated again, this time with two other Yorkshire regiments. It became the 1st Battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th, 33rd and 76th Foot), with the The Green Howards (19th Foot) forming the 2nd Battalion and the Duke of Wellington's Regiment (33rd/76th Foot) forming the 3rd Battalion on 6 June 2006. Following further merges, in 2012, the battalion was re-designated as the new 2nd Battalion (2YORKS). The Regiment's Formation and name The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire was formed on 25th April 1958 by the amalgamation of The West Yorkshire Regiment (The Prince Of Wales's Own) (14th Foot) and the East Yorkshire Regiment (The Duke of York's Own) (15th Foot). The first overseas posting for the newly-formed Regiment was Aden, Yemen from September 1958 to June 1959. This was followed by Gibraltar from June 1959 to June 1961. Brief histories of the antecedent regiments The stories of these two famous Regiments are, therefore, part of the history of The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire. The West Yorkshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales's Own) The West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own) (14th Foot) was an infantry regiment of the British Army. In 1958 it amalgamated with the East Yorkshire Regiment (15th Foot) to form the Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire which was, on 6 June 2006, amalgamated with the Green Howards and the Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding) to form the Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot). Early history The regiment was raised by Sir Edward Hales in 1685, by order of King James II. One of the nine new regiments of foot, raised to meet the Monmouth rebellion it was termed Hales's Regiment. The regiment served in Flanders between 1693 and 1696 and gained its first battle honour at Namur in 1695. 1715 saw the regiment moved to Scotland to fight the Jacobite risings. In 1727 the regiment played a major part in defending Gibraltar against the Spanish, where it remained garrisoned for the next 15 years. 1745 saw the regiment in Flanders fighting at Fontenoy before being recalled to Scotland to fight the '45 Rebellion. Fighting at Falkirk and Culloden, it became the 14th of Foot in 1751. The regiment returned to Gibraltar in 1751 for another 8-year stay. In 1759, when stationed at Windsor, it was granted royal permission to wear the White Horse of Hanover signifying the favour of the King. In 1766, the regiment left Portsmouth for North America and was stationed in Nova Scotia. In 1770 the 14th although at the ready in their barracks did not play a part in the Boston Massacre. Captain Thomas (29th Foot) was the officer of the day in charge of the duty detail (29th of Foot) that faced the crowds outside of the Customs House. The crowd that gathered began taunting the detail until a shot, then volley was fired into the crowd, three civilians were killed outright and two more died later. Captain Preston and the detail went to trial and were defended (successfully) by Lawyer John Adams thus ending tensions between the crown and the citizens of Boston for the time being. The 14th would remain part of the Boston Garrison until 1772. In 1772, the 14th arrived in St Vincent as part of the force to subjugate the maroons. Due to bush fighting and disease the regiment was depleted in numbers, it stayed for two years and was then scheduled to return to England in 1774. Due to the rising tensions in the colonies the regiment's return was cancelled and instead it was redeployed piecemeal, under Major Jonathan Furlong to St. Augustine, Florida and Providence Island in the Bahamas. At dawn on 1 January 1776, the fleet opened fire on Norfolk. Between the firing (burning) of the buildings and the fleet firing on the town, Norfolk burned for three days, 863 buildings were destroyed. After the fleet left, the rebels reoccupied what remained of the town but soon decided to burn even that to keep Lord Dunmore from using it. After all was said and done, 1,298 buildings were destroyed and the 5th largest city in colonial America ceased to exist. After Norfolk, the fleet left for Turkey Point near Portsmouth where it would base operations. While at Turkey Point there were a series of small raids and skirmishes. The fleet would stay at Turkey Point only until late May when it would leave for Gwynn's Island. In August, the fleet withdrew from the Chesapeake and headed to New York. The 14th was withdrawn from service, it being severely under strength from disease and battle in both the Caribbean and Virginia. In New York the remaining men of the regiment were used to supplement other regiments in the area. The officers were sent back to Britain to recruit a new regiment. In 1777, while in training in England, one company each of the 14th and the 15th regiments were placed under the command of Col. Patrick Ferguson and sent to America to test the concept of the rifle company with the Colonel's new rifle. The rifle companies fought well at the battle of Brandywine in Pennsylvania on 11 September. After the experimental rifle companies returned to England they were made the light companies of their respective regiments; thus ended the 14th Regiment's participation in the American Revolution. In 1782 the 14th was named The 14th (Bedfordshire) Regiment. The arrival of the French Revolution and the subsequent French invasion of the Low Countries caused troops to be sent to protect trade interests. The 14th gained its second battle honour around Lille. In 1793 at the battle of Famars in Flanders the 14th became the only regiment ever to win its regimental march in battle, the French revolutionary song “Ça Ira”. They returned to England in 1795, then the Regiment was posted to the West Indies where it was on duty until 1803. In February 1797 the regiment participated in the bloodless invasion of Trinidad. The outbreak of the Napoleonic Wars in 1803 led to the expansion of the British Army. The 14th formed a second battalion in Belfast in 1804, and a third battalion in 1813. The 1st Battalion spent much of the war on garrison duty in Bengal. In 1809 the Regiment was re-titled The 14th (Buckinghamshire) Regiment. The 1st Battalion served in India for 25 years until 1831. During this period the 1st Battalion took part in campaigns against the French in Mauritius in 1810, and the Dutch in Java in 1811, with Java adding another Battle Honour. In 1808-9, the 2nd Battalion joined the Peninsular Army and gained the Battle honour Corunna. The 2nd Battalion saw service in the Walcheren Campaign and was disbanded in 1817. The 3rd Battalion fought at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815; it was disbanded in 1816. After several sucessful actions in India, the 1st Battalion was, on returning home in 1831, granted the badge of the Royal Tiger, superscribed "India". Regimental colours, 1845 Regimental uniform, 1845 The 14th then was posted to the West Indies, Canada and Malta. In 1855 the Regiment served in the Crimean war and took part in the capture of Sevastopol. In 1858 the 2nd Battalion was re-formed and sent to New Zealand and took part in the New Zealand Wars and the Second Anglo-Afghan War. In 1876 the Prince of Wales later Edward VII, presented new Colours to the 1st Battalion in Lucknow, and conferred on the 14th the honoured title of "The Prince of Wales's Own". During 1880 the British army saw major changes, The Childers Reforms. In 1881 the 14th was given the title "The Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment)". The Depot of the 14th was established at Imphal Barracks in York. British lines (Buckinghamshire Regiment) under fire. Illustration to the Crimean War by James E. Alexander. Second Boer War 1899 saw the 2nd Battalion sent to the Second Boer War 1899-1902 in South Africa and after a number of engagements two members of the Battalion were awarded the Victoria Cross: Captain (later Colonel) Mansel-Jones in February 1900, and Sergeant Traynor in February 1901. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd Volunteer Battalions sent service companies to the Boer War and were granted the battle honour South Africa 1900–02. Early 20th Century When the Territorial Force was created in 1908, the Volunteer Battalions linked to the regiment became Territorial Battalions of the West Yorkshire Regiment: 1st (V) Bn became 5th Bn (TF), with RHQ at York. 2nd (V) Bn became 6th Bn (TF), with RHQ at Belle View Barracks, Bradford. 3rd (V) Bn became 7th and 8th (Leeds Rifles) Bns (TF), a double battalion with RHQ at Carlton Barracks, Leeds. First World War Memorial to the men of the 16th Battalion and the 18th Battalion of the regiment who died in the First World War Regular Army The 1st Battalion landed at Saint-Nazaire as part of the 18th Brigade in the 6th Division in September 1914 for service on the Western Front. The 1st Battalion was part of the original Expeditionary Force at the outbreak of the First World War, rapidly followed by the 2nd. The 2nd Battalion landed at Le Harve as part of the 23rd Brigade in the 8th Division in November 1914 also for service on the Western Front. The Regiment grew to 37 battalions, including Territorials, of which 24 saw action overseas and received many decorations. Among these was the French Croix de Guerre awarded to the 8th (Leeds Rifles) Battalion for gallantry in the capture of Bligny Ridge. Territorial Force The 1/5th, 1/6th, 1/7th and 1/8th Battalions landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the West Riding Brigade in the West Riding Division in April 1915 also for service on the Western Front. The 2/5th, 2/6th, 2/7th and 2/8th Battalions landed at Le Havre as part of the 185th (2/1st West Riding) Brigade in the 62nd (2nd West Riding) Division in January 1917 also for service on the Western Front. New Armies The 9th (Service) Battalion landed at Suvla Bay in Gallipoli as part of the 32nd Brigade in the 11th (Northern) Division in August 1915; the battalion was evacuated from Gallipoli in January 1916 and landed in Marseille in July 1916 for service on the Western Front. The 10th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 50th Brigade in the 17th (Northern) Division in July 1915 for service on the Western Front. The 11th (Service) Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 69th Brigade in the 23rd Division in August 1915 for service on the Western Front and then transferred to Italy in November 1917. The 12th (Service) Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 63rd Infantry Brigade in the 21st Division in September 1915 also for service on the Western Front. Men of a pioneer battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment, possibly the 21st (Service) Battalion (Wool Textile Pioneers), having a meal in a shell hole on the roadside near Ypres, Belgium, 23 December 1917. The 15th (Service) Battalion (1st Leeds), raised by the Lord Mayor and City of Leeds, and the 16th (Service) Battalion (1st Bradford), raised by the Lord Mayor and City of Bradford, landed in Egypt as part of the 93rd Brigade in the 31st Division in December 1915 and then moved to France in March 1916 for service on the Western Front. The 17th (Service) Battalion (2nd Leeds), raised by the Lord Mayor and City of Leeds, landed at Le Havre as part of the 106th Brigade in the 35th Division in February 1916 for service on the Western Front. The 18th (Service) Battalion (2nd Bradford), raised by the Lord Mayor and City of Bradford, landed in Egypt as part of the 93rd Brigade in the 31st Division in December 1915 and then moved to France in March 1916 for service on the Western Front. The 21st (Service) Battalion (Wool Textile Pioneers) landed in France as pioneer battalion to the 4th Division in June 1916 also for service on the Western Front. The Roll of Honour, including over 13,000 names, may be seen in the Regimental Chapel in York Minster. With a return to peace in 1918, the Regiment was reduced to two Regular and four Territorial Battalions. Inter-war years In 1936 the 8th (Leeds Rifles) Battalion transferred to the Royal Artillery as 66th (Leeds Rifles, The West Yorkshire Regiment) Anti-Aircraft Brigade. In 1937 the 6th Battalion became 49th (The West Yorkshire Regiment) Anti-Aircraft Battalion of the Royal Engineers, converting to a searchlight regiment of the Royal Artillery in 1940. In April 1938 the 7th (Leeds Rifles) Battalion converted to the armoured role as 45th (Leeds Rifles) Bn, Royal Tank Regiment. In June 1939, the company at Morley was split off to form the cadre for a duplicate unit, the 51st (Leeds Rifles) Bn, Royal Tank Regiment. Second World War Both the 1st and 2nd battalions of the West Yorks served in the Far East throughout the Burma Campaign, fighting in the British Fourteenthth Army. The 2nd Battalion served with the 9th Indian Infantry Brigade from November 1940. In 1942 2/5th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment was converted to armour, becoming 113th Regiment Royal Armoured Corps. As with all infantry battalions converted in this way, they continued to wear their West Yorkshire cap badge on the black beret of the RAC. 51st (Leeds Rifles) Royal Tank Regiment, formed as a 2nd Line duplicate of 45th (Leeds Rifles) Royal Tank Regiment (previously the 7th (Leeds Rifles) Battalion of the West Yorks), served in 25th Army Tank Brigade in the Italian campaign under the command of Brigadier Noel Tetley of the Leeds Rifles, who was the only Territorial Army RTR officer to command a brigade on active service. The regiment distinguished itself in support of the 1st Canadian Infantry Division in the assault on the Hitler Line in May 1944. At the request of the Canadians, 51 RTR adopted the Maple Leaf as an additional badge, which is still worn by its successors, the Leeds Detachment (Leeds Rifles), Imphal (PWO) Company, The East and West Riding Regiment. Men of the West Yorkshire Regiment and 10th Gurkha Rifles advance along the Imphal-Kohima road behind Lee-Grant tanks, July 1944 Battalion HQ of 1st West Yorkshire Regiment in a temple near Meiktila, 28 February 1945. Men of the West Yorkshire Regiment search Japanese dugouts in Meiktila, 28 February 1945. Post-war years In 1948 the 1st and 2nd Battalions were amalgamated and were stationed in Austria. They then moved to Egypt and on to Malaya. After a tour of duty in Northern Ireland in 1955-56, the 1st Battalion took part in the Suez Operation and was then stationed in Dover until the amalgamation in July 1958. In 1956 the merged 45th/51st (Leeds Rifles) RTR returned to the infantry role as 7th (Leeds Rifles) Bn West Yorkshire Regt and in 1961 it re-absorbed the 466th (Leeds Rifles) Light Anti-Aircraft Regt, RA, to form The Leeds Rifles, The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire. Battle honours The regiment's battle honours were as follows: Namur 1695, Tournay, Corunna, India, Java, Waterloo, Bhurtpore, Sevastopol, New Zealand, Afghanistan 1879-80, Relief of Ladysmith, South Africa 1899-1902 (South Africa 1900–02 for Volunteer Battalions) The Great War [31 battalions]: Aisne 1914 '18, Armentières 1914, Neuve Chapelle, Aubers, Hooge 1915, Loos, Somme 1916 '18, Albert 1916 '18, Bazentin, Pozières, Flers-Courcelette, Morval, Thiepval, Le Transloy, Ancre Heights, Ancre 1916, Arras 1917 '18, Scarpe 1917 '18, Bullecourt, Hill 70, Messines 1917 '18, Ypres 1917 '18, Pilckem, Langemarck 1917, Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Poelcappelle, Passchendaele, Cambrai 1917 '18, St. Quentin, Rosières, Villers Bretonneux, Lys, Hazebrouck, Bailleul, Kemmel, Marne 1918, Tardenois, Amiens, Bapaume 1918, Drocourt-Quéant, Hindenburg Line, Havrincourt, Épéhy, Canal du Nord, Selle, Valenciennes, Sambre, France and Flanders 1914-18, Piave, Vittorio Veneto, Italy 1917-18, Suvla, Landing at Suvla, Scimitar Hill, Gallipoli 1915, Egypt 1915-16 The Second World War: North-West Europe 1940, Jebel Dafeis, Keren, Ad Teclesan, Abyssinia 1940-41, Cauldron, Defence of Alamein Line, North Africa 1940-42, Pegu 1942, Yenangyaung 1942, North Arakan, Maungdaw, Defence of Sinzweya, Imphal, Bishenpur, Kanglatongbi, Meiktila, Capture of Meiktila, Defence of Meiktila, Rangoon Road, Pyawbwe, Sittang 1945, Burma 1942-45 7th Bn (Leeds Rifles) wore a Maple Leaf badge in commemoration of the assault on the Adolf Hitler Line, and bore the badge of the Royal Tank Regiment with dates '1942–45' and two scrolls inscribed 'North Africa' and 'Italy' as an honorary distinction on the colours and appointments. Victoria Crosses The following members of the Regiment were awarded the Victoria Cross: Captain (later Colonel) Conwyn Mansel-Jones, Second Boer War Sergeant William Bernard Traynor, Second Boer War Private William Boynton Butler, Great War Corporal (later Major) Samuel Meekosha, Great War Sergeant Albert Mountain, Great War Corporal (later Captain) George Sanders, Great War Acting Sergeant Hanson Victor Turner, Second World War Colonels-in-Chief 1947: Maj-Gen. HRH Princess Mary, The Princess Royal, CI, GCVO, GBE, RRC, TD Colonels of the Regiment Colonels of the regiment included: 1685–1688: Lt-Gen. Sir Edward Hales, 3rd Baronet 1688–1692: Col. William Beveridge 1692–1713: Lt-Gen. John Tidcomb 1713–1743: Lt-Gen. Jasper Clayton 1743–1747: Brig-Gen. John Price 1747–1753: Maj-Gen. Hon. William Herbert 14th Regiment of Foot 1753–1755: Maj-Gen. Edward Braddock 1755–1756: Lt-Gen. Thomas Fowke 1756–1765: Maj-Gen. Charles Jeffereys 1765–1775: Lt-Gen. Hon. William Keppel 1775–1787: Gen. The Rt. Hon. Robert Cuninghame, 1st Baron Rossmore, PC 14th (Bedfordshire) Regiment of Foot 1787–1789: Lt-Gen. John Douglas 1789: Col. George Waldegrave, 4th Earl Waldegrave 1789–1806: Gen. George Hotham 1806–1826: Gen. Sir Harry Calvert, 1st Baronet, GCB, GCH 14th (Buckinghamshire) Regiment 1826–1834: Gen. Thomas Graham, 1st Baron Lynedoch, GCB, GCMG 1834: Sir Charles Colville, GCB, GCH 1835–1837: Gen. Hon. Sir Alexander Hope, GCB 1837–1862: Gen. Sir James Watson, KCB 1862–1870: Gen. Sir William Wood, KCB, KH 1870–1875: Gen. Maurice Barlow, CB 1875–1879: Gen. James Webber Smith, CB The 14th (Buckinghamshire) Prince of Wales's Own Regiment 1879–1880: Gen. Sir Alfred Hastings Horsford, GCB 1880–1897: Gen. Alfred Thomas Heyland, CB The Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment) 1897–1904: Gen. Sir Martin Andrew Dillon, GCB, CSI 1904–1914: Maj-Gen. William Hanbury Hawley 1914–1934: Maj-Gen. Sir William Fry, KCVO, CB The West Yorkshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales's Own) 1934–1947: F.M. Sir Cyril John Deverell, GCB, KBE 1947–1956: F.M. Sir William Joseph Slim, 1st Viscount Slim, KG, GCB, GCMG, GCVO, GBE, DSO, MC 1956–1958: Brig. Gerald Hilary Cree, CBE, DS West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own) (14th Foot) Cap Badge Active 1685-1958 Country Kingdom of England (1685-1707) Kingdom of Great Britain (1707-1800) United Kingdom (1801-1958) Branch British Army Size 1-3 Regular Battalions Up to 2 Militia and Special Reserve Battalions Up to 4 Territorial and Volunteer Battalions Up to 23 Hostilities-only Battalions Garrison/HQ Imphal Barracks, Fulford, York Calvert's Entire, The Old and Bold Motto(s) Nec Aspera Terrent (Afraid of No Hardships) March Ça Ira Anniversaries Imphal (22 June) Commanders Colonel-in-Chief Maj-Gen. HRH Princess Mary, The Princess Royal, CI, GCVO, GBE, RRC, TD Last Colonel of the Regiment Brig. Gerald Hilary Cree, CBE, DS The East Yorkshire Regiment (The Duke of York's Own) The East Yorkshire Regiment was a line infantry regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1685 as Sir William Clifton's Regiment of Foot. It saw service for three centuries, before being amalgamated with the West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own) to form the Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire in 1958. Subsequently, the regiment amalgamated with the Green Howards and the Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding) to form the Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) on 6 June 2006. Early history John Theophilus Rawdon-Hastings, 2nd son of the 1st Earl of Moira, in the uniform of the 15th Regiment of Foot (1776) with a flintlock gun. The Regiment was raised in Nottingham on 22nd June 1685 by Sir William Clifton, 3rd Baronet, the regiment was originally, like many British infantry regiments, known by the name of its current Colonel, soon saw service in Scotland and Flanders. In 1702 the 15th Foot formed part of Marlborough's Army and took part in the battles of Blenheim in 1704, Ramillies (1706), Malpaquet (1709) and Oudenarde in 1708 during the War of the Spanish Succession, the Jacobite Rising of 1719 and at the Battle of Cartagena de Indias in 1741 during the War of Jenkins' Ear. In 1751, when the numerical system of designation of Regiments of Foot was adopted, it became the 15th Regiment of Foot. The regiment went on to take part in the capture of Île-d'Aix in 1757, and the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in 1759 during the Seven Years' war were the Regiment played a major part in the in the defeat of the French for the conquest of Canada. The mourning worn for the loss of General Wolfe at the heights of Abraham was perpetuated in the black background to the silver rose of the collar dogs worn by The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire for many years. The 15th foot fought in the war of American Independence from 1776 to 1778. At the Battle of Brandywine in 1777, the 15th ran short of ball ammunition so all but the best shots fired small powder charges only. The bluff succeeded and the battle was won, and the Regiment gained the nickname "The Snappers". In 1782 the regiment became the 15th (The Yorkshire East Riding) Regiment of Foot. in 1790 the Regiment returned ti the West Indies for another six years; of 102 accompanying wives, only seven returned to England. It again fought in the West Indies during the Napoleonic Wars, taking part in the invasions of Martinique in 1809 and Guadeloupe in 1810. The regiment spent most of the 19th century on garrison duty, both at home and throughout the Empire. The 1st Battalion was shipped to New Brunswick in 1862 at the time of the Trent Affair, when Britain and the United States came close to war. With the Childers Reforms of 1881, it became The East Yorkshire Regiment, the County Regiment of the East Riding of Yorkshire. The 2nd Battalion fought in the Second Anglo-Afghan War and the Second Boer War. Service in the Boer War of South Africa produced many casualties, commemorated in the south aisle of Beverley Minster. First World War Men of the 8th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment, going up to the line near Frezenberg during the Battle of Broodseinde, 1917. Photo by Ernest Brooks Regular Army The 1st Battalion landed at Saint-Nazaire as part of the 18th Brigade in the 6th Division in September 1914 for service on the Western Front. The 2nd Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 83rd Brigade in the 28th Division in January 1915 also for service on the Western Front before moving to Salonika in October 1915 for service on the Macedonian Front. Territorial Force The 1/4th Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the York and Durham Brigade in the Northumbrian Division in April 1915 for service on the Western Front. New Armies The 6th (Service) Battalion landed at Suvla Bay in Gallipoli as the pioneer battalion for the 11th (Northern) Division in August 1915; the battalion was evacuated in January 1916 and then landed at Marseille in July 1916 for service on the Western Front. The 7th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of 50th Brigade in the 17th (Northern) Division in July 1915 also for service on the Western Front. The 8th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 62nd Brigade in the 21st Division in September 1915 also for service on the Western Front. The 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th (Service) Battalions were raised in Serptember 1914 from men volunteering in Hull. These units were additionally entitled 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th City of Hull battalions. They landed in Egypt as part of the 92nd Brigade in the 31st Division in December 1915 and then moved to France in March 1916 also for service on the Western Front. During the First World War the Regiment grew rapidly to 21 battalions and won four VC's among a large number of decorations. Between the wars Following the Armistice of 1918, battalions of the Regiment served in Iraq, India and North China. In 1935 the regiment was renamed The East Yorkshire Regiment (The Duke of York's Own), after its Colonel-in-Chief. Second World War In the Second World War, six hostilities-only battalions were raised. The 1st Battalion was serving in British India on the outbreak of war in 1939 and did not see active service until 1942 when the Empire of Japan entered the war. The battalion fought in the Burma Campaign in many different British Indian Army brigades. The 2nd, 4th and 5th battalions, the latter two being Territorial units sent to France in 1939, fought in the Battle of France and were evacuated at Dunkirk. Following this, battalions of the regiment served in the Middle East in the North African campaign and in the Invasion of Sicily. The 2nd and 5th were in the initial assault on the beaches when they took part in the invasion of Normandy in 1944, and the liberation of Western Europe. The 1st were in the final advance in the Burma Campaign prior to the Japanese surrender in August 1945. The 2nd Battalion served with the 8th Infantry Brigade (which included the 1st Suffolks and 1st South Lancs), attached to the 3rd Infantry Division throughout the whole war. At the time, the 3rd Division was commanded by Major-General Bernard Montgomery, who would later command the Anglo-Canadian 21st Army Group. The battalion and division were sent to France in late 1939 as part of the British Expeditionary Force and remained there until May 1940 when they fought in the Battle of France and were evacuated at Dunkirk. After Dunkirk, the battalion and division spent many years on home defence anticipating a German invasion of England. After late 1942 when the threat of invasion receded, they then started training for offensive operations and, in mid-1944, invaded Normandy, France. Men of the 2nd Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment take cover behind a bank as an enemy shell explodes nearby, Normandy, France, 19 July 1944. The 4th Battalion was a 1st Line Territorial Army unit serving in the 150th Infantry Brigade in the 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division and, like the 2nd Battalion, served in France 1940, were evacuated at Dunkirk to England and remained in the United Kingdom with the division until mid-1941 when it was sent to the Middle East. The 5th Battalion was formed in 1939 as a 2nd Line Territorial Army duplicate of the 4th Battalion. It served with the 69th Infantry Brigade in the 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division. Men of the 2nd Battalion, The East Yorkshire Regiment in a Universal Carrier on field exercise in Palestine After the War The regiment was in Mandatory Palestine during the Zionist insurgency and then took part in the Malayan Emergency in 1953–56 before returning to Germany as part of the British Army of the Rhine. In 1958, the surviving 1st Battalion left Germany for Dover, and amalgamation with The West Yorkshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales's Own), to form the Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire. Battle honours Regulation Queens and regimental colours The regiment’s battle honours were as follows: Blenheim, Ramillies, Oudenarde, Malplaquet, Louisburg, Quebec 1759, Martinique 1762, Havannah, St. Lucia 1778, Martinique 1794 1809, Guadeloupe 1810, Afghanistan 1879-80, South Africa 1900-02 The Great War (21 battalions): Aisne 1914 '18, Armentières 1914, Ypres 1915 '17 '18, Gravenstafel, St. Julien, Frezenberg, Bellewaarde, Hooge 1915, Loos, Somme 1916 '18, Albert 1916 '18, Bazentin, Delville Wood, Pozières, Flers-Courcelette, Morval, Thiepval, Ancre Heights, Ancre 1916, Arras 1917 '18, Scarpe 1917 '18, Arleux, Oppy, Messines 1917 '18, Pilckem, Langemarck 1917, Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Broodseinde, Poelcappelle, Passchendaele, Cambrai 1917 '18, St. Quentin, Bapaume 1918, Rosières, Lys, Estaires, Hazebrouck, Kemmel, Scherpenberg, Amiens, Hindenburg Line, Épéhy, Canal du Nord, St. Quentin Canal, Selle, Sambre, France and Flanders 1914-18, Struma, Doiran 1917, Macedonia 1915-18, Suvla, Landing at Suvla, Scimitar Hill, Gallipoli 1915, Egypt 1915-16 The Second World War: Withdrawal to Escaut, Defence of Escaut, Defence of Arras, French Frontier 1940, Ypres-Comines Canal, Dunkirk 1940, Normandy Landing, Tilly sur Seulles, Odon, Caen, Bourguébus Ridge, Troarn, Mont Pincon, St. Pierre la Vielle, Gheel, Nederrijn, Aam, Venraij, Rhineland, Schaddenhof, Brinkum, Bremen, North-West Europe 1940 '44-45, Gazala, Mersa Matruh, Defence of Alamein Line, El Alamein, Mareth, Wadi Zigzaou, Akarit, North Africa 1942-43, Primosole Bridge, Sicily 1943, Sittang 1945, Burma 1945 Victoria Cross recipients The following members of the regiment were awarded the Victoria Cross: Private George William Chafer, Great War Private John Cunningham, Great War Second Lieutenant John Harrison, Great War Sergeant Harold Jackson, Great War Private Eric Anderson, Second World War Colonels of the Regiment Colonels of the regiment included: 1685–1686: Col. Sir William Clifton, 3rd Baronet 1686–1687: Col. Arthur Herbert, 1st Earl of Torrington 1687–1688: Col. Hon. Sackville Tufton 1688–1695: Col. Sir James Lesley 1695–1709: Lt-Gen. Hon. Emanuel Scrope Howe 1709–1715: Gen. Algernon Seymour, 7th Duke of Somerset and Earl of Hertford 1715–1749: Lt-Gen. Henry Harrison 1749–1756: Col. John Jordan The 15th Regiment of Foot 1756–1768: F.M. Sir Jeffrey Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst, KB 1768–1775: Lt-Gen. Sir Charles Hotham-Thompson, 8th Baronet, KB 1775–1778: Lt-Gen. Richard Lambart, 6th Earl of Cavan 1778–1792: Gen. Sir William Fawcett, KB The 15th (York, East Riding) Regiment 1792–1794: Gen. James Inglis Hamilton 1794–1814: Gen. Henry Watson Powell 1814–1846: Gen. Sir Moore Disney, KCB 1846–1850: Gen. Sir Phineas Riall, KCH 1850–1851: Maj-Gen. Sir Henry Watson, CB 1851–1861: Gen. Sir Howard Douglas, 3rd Baronet, GCB, GCMG 1861–1868: Lt-Gen. William Booth 1868–1877: Gen. Thomas Armstrong Drought 1877–1888: Gen. Sir William Montagu Scott McMurdo, GCB The East Yorkshire Regiment 1888–1889: Gen. Edward George Wynyard 1889–1890: Gen. John Hope Wingfield 1890–1891: Gen. Robert Bruce 1891–1897: Gen. Edward Westby Donovan 1897–1901: Lt-Gen. William Hardy, CB 1901–1920: Maj-Gen. Sir Coleridge Grove, KCB 1920–1925: Maj-Gen. Francis Seymour Inglefield, CB, DSO 1925–1930: Maj-Gen. Sir Gerald Farrell Boyd, KCB, CMG, DSO, DCM 1930–1933: Brig-Gen. Henry Haggard 1933–1940: Brig-Gen. John Louis Justice Clarke, CMG 1940–1948: Lt-Gen. Sir Desmond Francis Anderson, KBE, CB, CMG, DSO 1948–1958: Brig. Robert John Springhall, CB, OBE East Yorkshire Regiment (The Duke of York's Own) Cap badge of the East Yorkshire Regiment Active 1685-1958 Country Kingdom of England (1685-1707) Kingdom of Great Britain (1707-1800) United Kingdom (1801-1958) Branch British Army Type Infantry Role Line infantry Size 1-2 Regular Battalions 1 Militia Battalion 2 Territorial Battalions Up to 16 Hostilities-only battalions Garrison/HQ Victoria Barracks, Beverley Anniversaries Quebec (13 September) The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire (14th, 15th) 1960's The Battalion served in Wuppertal, West Germany from 1961 to 1964, Berlin 1964-1965, then again in Aden from September 1965 till September 1966, then was based in Colchester, England from 1966 till 1969. The year 1967 saw deployment of operational elements to Cornwall to assist with the environmental clean-up following the Torrey Canyon oil-spill disaster. An emergency deployment back to Aden in June after the mutinies by the South Arabian Federation Army and Yemen Federal Police. Aden saw the deaths in action of two soldiers from the Regiment, Pte F Langrick and Sgt WS Saville, as well as the awards of one Military Cross one Military Medal and a Mention In Despatches. The Battalion returned to Colchester in late 1967. This period also saw the formation of South Yemen. 14 August 1960, shortly after 1700 hrs local time, 300 troops from the 1st Battalion, Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire, occupied the centre of Derry. In April 1969, the Battalion was deployed to Northern Ireland, as part of the UK Government's response to terrorist attacks on the Government infrastructure in the province, they effectively became the first British military unit to become involved in the resulting years of sectarian violence. 1PWO's presence and constant patrolling of vital points initially stabilised the situation in the Regiments operational area of County Down. On 12 July, sectarian violence led to a rapid redeployment to Londonderry (Derry). Decisive action by the Royal Ulster Constabulary again calmed the situation down and the Battalion moved into a fixed tactical base at Magilligan's Point, north of Limavady on the shores of Lough Foyle. On 12 August, the violence erupted in a concerted campaign which, after nearly three days of street battles, saw the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) totally exhausted. On 14 August 1969, 1PWO - on behalf of the British Army - took over responsibility for the security of Derry. 1970's HRH The Duchess of Kent Colonel-in Chief of the Regiment From February 1970 to October 1972, the Battalion were based in Cyprus, and returned to the UK in 1972 for another tour of Northern Ireland, ending in November 1973. From November 1973 until May 1974, the Regiment was stationed in Dover, Kent. From 1974 to 1978, the Regiment was stationed in Celle (formerly in West Germany), as part of the 7th Armoured Brigade, equipped with FV 432. The battalion completed another four-month emergency tour in Derry during 1975. During this tour 18-year-old Pte David Wray was shot and killed by a sniper whilst on foot patrol in the Creggan housing estate. From 1978 to 1983 the Regiment served as the 'Allied Mobile Force' in Norway (AMF(L)N) and exercised extensively in Norway where Companies were fully ski-borne. 1980's In May 1983 the Battalion started a two year tour as part of the 'Berlin Infantry Brigade', where in 1984 it was presented with new Regimental Colours. In April 1985 the Battalion redeployed to Abercorn Barracks, Ballykinler, Northern Ireland and was heavily committed in domestic duties, maintaining law and order, particularly in the terrorist plagued countryside of South Armagh. In May 1987 the Regiment moved to Catterick, North Yorkshire, to join 24 Infantry Brigade, equipped with Saxon APC, this was the Battalions first tour in Yorkshire since their antecedent regiments amalgamation. in 1988, the Battalion re-roled as an airmobile unit in line with 24 Infantry Brigade's conversion to 24 Airmobile Brigade and were able to deploy 42 Milan Anti-tank guided missiles. 1990's In August 1990 the Battalion moved to Osnabrück in West Germany to take up a Mechanised Infantry role as part of 12 Armoured Brigade. During the First Gulf War, or Operation Granby (later known as Desert storm) the Battalion deployed formed units that included a Milan Section and a Mortar Section to the 1st Battalion of the Staffordshire Regiment, many men deployed on an individual basis reinforcing units. Up to one third of the Battalion (149 personnel of all ranks) were deployed to the Gulf. During Winter 1991 the Battalion was once again in Northern Ireland, as the west Belfast Roulement Battalion and had as successful tour. On return the Battalion was re-equipped with the Warrior tracked armoured vehicle, with training on the German Soltau training area. During Winter 1991, the battalion was once again in Northern Ireland, as the west Belfast roulement battalion. As a result of the 1992 Strategic Defence Review the then government of John Major decided to bring Territorial Army (TA) and Regular Army units closer together, as a result the 2nd Battalion The Yorkshire Volunteers became 3rd Battalion The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire (Yorkshire Volunteers). The 3rd Battalion was based at York. 3PWO lasted for 6 years until defence cuts reduce the size of the TA to two thirds of its original size in 1998. 1993 saw the Regiment deployed to Bosnia-Herzegovina as part of UNPFOR, with Companies in Gornji Vakuf and Vitez. They picked up the unofficial nickname of "ShootBat" due to the 'robustness' of the Battalions actions. In 1994 they moved to the British Army Training Unit Suffield, Canada followed by a move to Warminster as the Infantry Demonstration Battalion at the Land Warfare Centre. 1997 saw the Battalion stationed in Chester with deployments to Ulster, Sierra Leone (Operation Basillica), support to Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food during the foot and mouth outbreak. Training exercises took troops to Kenya, Jamaica, Italy and Oman. 2000 - Present By 2001-2003 1PWO was in Omagh followed by a move to Catterick Garrison as an Air Assault Battalion, with deployments to Bosnia, as part of SFOR and a training exercise to Belize in 2005. A Prince of Wales's Own Regiment Soldier Amalgamation After 48 years service the Regiment was again amalgamated, with two other Yorkshire Regiments. Becoming the First Battalion of The Yorkshire Regiment, with The Green Howards (19th Foot) forming the Second Battalion and The Duke of Wellington's Regiment (33rd/76th foot) forming the Third Battalion on 6 June 2006. The Regiment conducted three tours in Aden, two in Bosnia, six in Northern Ireland, one in Sierra Leone. The Prince of Wales’s Own Regiment of Yorkshire Museum The Prince of Wales’s Own Regiment of Yorkshire Museum is located in the heart of York, North Yorkshire, near the Jorvik Viking Centre and opposite Clifford's Tower. The exhibits include artifacts and photographs displaying the Regiment's history in various campaigns, include the Crimean War, the North-West Frontier of India, the Boer War, World War I and World War II. Items on display include medals and decorations, uniforms, weapons and other memorabilia. There is also a Regimental gift shop. The Museum is located in the same building as the Royal Dragoon Guards Museum at 3a Tower Street - 53.95624°N 1.0809°W. The Prince of Wales's own Regiment of Yorkshire Cap badge of the Prince of Wales's own Regiment of Yorkshire Active 1958 - 2006 Country Great Britain Branch Army Type Line Infantry Size One battalion Part of King's Division Garrison/HQ Imphal Barracks, York March Quick - Ca Ira and Yorkshire Lass Mascot Imphal and Quebec - Ferrets Commanders Colonel-in-Chief HRH, The Duchess of Kent Insignia Tactical Recognition Flash MILITARY - BRITISH ARMY Other Badges and items are also available via 'Buy it Now' from our eBay Shop. Buyers!!! Please read all of the Sale listing before buying, including the section below, and note acceptable methods of Payment and Postage details (especially if you are buying from outside the UK). We will not be held accountable for the buyers own mistakes. Please do keep a lookout for our other Sale lots coming soon!!! Or visit our eBay Shop 'Tomo & Val's Collectables' Check out our other Items For Sale! Be sure to add us to your favourites list! Summary of Our Selling Policies Payment We accept UK Personal Cheques, UK Postal Orders and PayPal only. For those unable to use the above, please contact us first via email to make alternate payment arrangements. Shipping We ship Worldwide. Our postage rates are displayed clearly in our listings. If approached first by the buyer, we can arrange postage to suit (including insurance if required). Delivery Shipment is normally within 1 day of Payment clearing. We ship every working day, and on Saturday morning's (except UK Public Holidays). Refunds & Returns Full refund will be given up to 30 days after receipt of item, if the item is not as described in our listing. Provided the item is returned to us in it's original sealed packaging, and is undamaged. Refund (less p&p costs) will be given if Buyer changes their own mind over purchase. Provided the item is returned to us in it's original sealed packaging, and is undamaged. Contact Us Contact can be made via Email, and we usually respond back the same day. BID WITH CONFIDENCE Pictures sell! Auctiva Offers Free Image Hosting and Editing.250+ Listing Templates! Auctiva gets you noticed! The complete eBay Selling Solution. Track Page Views With Auctiva's FREE Counter Condition: New, Type: Beret/ Cap/ Hat Badges, Theme: Military, Sub-Theme: British Army, Regiment Type: Infantry, Material: Chromed WM, Decade: 2000 to Present, Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom

8w7n.com Insights 8w7n.com Exclusif
  •  Popularité - 1.067 vues, 2.8 views per day, 382 days on eBay. Super grande quantité sur vues. 7 vendu, 15 disponibles.
  •  Prix -
  •  Vendeur - 13.410+ articles vendu. 0% évaluations négative. Grand vendeur avec la très bonne rétroaction positive et plus de 50 cotes.
Articles similaires Items
SitemapMr. Fantastic Reed Richards, also known as Mr. Fantastic, is the leader of the Fantastic Four. He can stretch his body to great distances due to his exposure to cosmic rays while in space. He is also considered to be one of the smartest men alive. | Die Highligen drei Könige | Loving Pablo